i, C.S.A. Share. Complete season vegie box. Shareholder.

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i, C.S.A. Share. Complete season vegie box. Shareholder.

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Community Supported Agriculture C.S.A Vegie box program, (ACO 12180) certified organic

You will receive a Vegie box every week for the remainder of the season.

 Purchase “CSA Share.”

(pay up front and receive a box every week)
Up to 26 weeks, Nov 8 2019 - May 15 2020 (pro rata)

  • standard box ($40/wk)

  • large box ($55/ wk)

  • 3 Pick Up options, no additional $3 weekly drop off fee, ex farm

  • Direct communication with the farm via email to vary orders, give feedback.

  • 20% off on farm workshops

  • two free Longley Organic Farm Vegie box program jute market bags.

  • extra produce when there is abundance

  • first choice on limited supply items.

  • support your farm!

  • If it’s a hard season you are supporting your local farmer to continue by sharing a small part of the risk – if limited produce available we will give you first priority on what we can produce.

  • Longley Organic Farm discount 10% on all other purchases.

  • Option to nominate two exclusions.


Pick Up locations 2019/20

Longley Organic Farm- Packing shed coolroom

Hobart- Collide Wholefoods, Criterion St.

Huonville- TBA


What is community supported agriculture?

In the United States, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) has been a popular
way for consumers to buy local, seasonal food directly from a farmer for the last
25 years.
Here are the basics: a farmer offers a certain number of 'shares' to the public.
Typically the share consists of a box of vegetables, but other farm products may
be included. Interested consumers purchase a share (aka a membership or a
subscription) and in return receive a box (bag, basket) of seasonal produce
each week throughout the farming season.

This arrangement creates several rewards for both the farmer and the consumer.

Advantages for farmers.

  • Get to spend time marketing the food early in the year, before their long days in the field begin.

  • Receive payment early in the season, which helps with the farms cash flow.

  • Have an opportunity to get to know the people who eat the food they grow.

Advantages for consumers.

 

  • Eat ultra-fresh food, with all the flavor and vitamin benefits.

  • Get exposed to new vegetables and new ways of cooking.

  • Usually get to visit the farm at least once a season.

  • Find that kids typically favour food from 'their farm' - even veggies they've never been known to eat

  • Develop a relationship with the farmer who grows their food and learn more about how food is grown.

  • It's a simple enough idea, but its impact has been profound. Tens of thousands of families have joined CSAs, and in some areas of the North America there is more demand than there are CSA farms to fill it.

Variations.

As you might expect with such a successful model, farmers have begun to
introduce variations. One increasingly common one is the 'mix and match', or
'market-style' CSA. Here, rather than making up a standard box of vegetables for
every member each week, the members load their own boxes with some degree
of personal choice. The farmer lays out baskets of the week's vegetables. Some
farmers encourage members to take a prescribed amount of what's available,
leaving behind just what their families do not care for. Some CSA farmers then
donate this extra produce to a food bank. In other CSAs, the members have wider choice to fill their box with whatever appeals to them, within certain limitations.
(e.g. 'Just one basket of strawberries per family, please')
CSAs aren't confined to produce. Some farmers include the option for
shareholders to buy shares of eggs, homemade bread, meat, cheese, fruit, flowers
or other farm products along with their vegies. Sometimes several farmers will
offer their products together, to offer the widest variety to their members. For
example, a produce farmer might create a partnership with a neighbor to deliver
chickens to the CSA drop off point, so that the CSA members can purchase farm-
fresh chickens when they come to get their CSA baskets. Other farmers are
creating standalone CSAs for meat, flowers, eggs, and preserved farm products.
So far in Tasmania we have only seen vege box systems where non-farming third
parties are setting up CSA-like businesses, where they act as middle men and sell
boxes of local (and sometimes non-local) food for their members. This model is
more closely aligns with conventional 'Shared Risk'.

Shared risk.

There is an important concept woven into the CSA model that takes the
arrangement beyond the usual commercial transaction. That is the notion of
shared risk: in most CSAs, members pay up front for the whole season and the
farmers do their best to provide an abundant box of produce each week. If things
are slim, members are not typically reimbursed. The result is a feeling of 'we're
in this together'. On some farms the idea of shared risk is stronger than others,
and CSA members may be asked to sign a policy form indicating that they agree
to accept without complaint whatever the farm can produce.
Many times, the idea of shared risk is part of what creates a sense of community
among members, and between members and the farmers. If a hailstorm takes
out all the capsicums, everyone is disappointed together, and together cheer on the
winter squash and broccoli. Most CSA farmers feel a great sense of responsibility
to their members, and when certain crops are scarce, they make sure the CSA
gets served first.
Still, it is worth noting that very occasionally things go wrong on a farm - like
they do in any kind of business - and the expected is not delivered, and members
feel shortchanged. Every year there are complaints about a few CSA farms (two to six farms a year, over the last nine years over thousands of CSA farms) where
something happened and the produce was simply unacceptable. It might have
been a catastrophic divorce, or an unexpected death in the family. Or the weather
was abominable, or the farmer was inexperienced and got in over his/her head.
In our experience, if the situation seems regrettable but reasonable - a bad thing
that in good faith could have happened to anyone - most CSA members will rally,
if they already know and trust the farmer. These people are more likely to take
the long view, especially if they have received an abundance of produce in the
past. They are naturally more likely to think, It'll be better next year, than are
new members who have nothing to which to compare a dismal experience. The
take-home message is this: if the potential for 'not getting your money's worth'
makes you feel anxious, then shared risk may not be for you and you should shop
at the farmers market.